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Romney is What's Wrong With the Republican Party Print E-mail
by Floyd and Mary Beth Brown    Sat, Jun 18, 2011, 12:40 pm

Reading Al Gore's comments on Mitt Romney we were reminded of all of the reason's we don't trust the man: "Good for Mitt Romney though we've long passed the point where weak lip-service is enough on the Climate Crisis. While other Republicans are running from the truth, he is sticking to his guns in the face of the anti-science wing of the Republican Party.

The so-called science of global warming is more media hype and Wall Street attempts to profit on trading carbon credits than it is real science. The scientific community is split on the topic with some climatologist predicting a new mini ice age. Mitt Romney's gullibility on this issue helps us understand why he has been so wrong on most of the vital issue of the last decade.

Romney is often trumpeted by his supporters as having business experience and they love to site this record of taking Massachusetts from a three billion dollar deficit to a one billion dollar surplus. But the cost of his balanced budgets was tough on business. Peter Nicholas, founder of Boston Scientific Corporation, stated it this way: tax rates on many corporations almost doubled because of legislation supported by Romney. Romney's tax policies were not helpful for many small businesses, when Romney took many IRS subchapter S businesses in Massachusetts and almost doubled their tax rates; it was an important disincentive to investment, growth and job creation.

The Cato Institute reports as Governor, Romney opposed $140 million in business tax hikes through the closing of loopholes in the tax code. This led to Joseph Crosby of the Council on State Taxation to say, Romney went further than any other governor in trying to wring money out of corporations.

Romney raised taxes on business by a total of $309 million. He increased taxes on business property. He then tried to raise taxes on hotels, but was stopped by the Democrat legislature. Romney at the time joined a coalition lobbying congress to tax internet activity, and he even supported a tax on out of state commuters.

Romney refused to support the Bush tax cuts while governor, and when campaigning for Governor, refused to sign the â?ono new taxes pledge, calling it government by gimmickry.

Now he wants us to believe he is a born again tax fighter.

But it is on the social issues that we get real heart burn. As star conservative researcher Steve Baldwin has pointed out: Romney changed his position on over thirty key issues as he prepared to run for President four years ago. Many of his conversion experiences are on issues we believe to be vital to the wellbeing of America's families.

As Governor Romney did great damage by unilaterally ordering homosexual marriage be instituted in Massachusetts. The Massachusetts Constitution clearly prohibits the judicial branch from specifically changing marriage statutes so when the court issued the Goodridge opinion favoring homosexual marriage, all Romney had to do was to declare the court had no jurisdiction and ignore it. Instead Romney asserted the opinion was now the law and ordered town clerks and Justices of the Peace to marry homosexuals, even though the legislature never acted to codify the ruling.

But the reason we will never support him for President is an action he took in 2005. Governor Romney personally issued special Governor's one-day marriage licenses to 189 same-sex couples, including to a homosexual activist state senator and others of his personal friends in the homosexual community.

We believe he can call a homosexual union whatever he wants, but it will never be a marriage. Marriage is the union of one man with one woman ordained by God for the purpose of creating a family. Even a President Romney can't trump God and God's nature. Let's hope Republican primary voters are smart enough to never let it come to that possibility.

Floyd and Mary Beth Brown are both bestselling authors and speakers. In 1988, working from their kitchen table, they formed Citizens United.

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Comments (3)add comment
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written by Ken Dickson , June 19, 2011

Seems like another RINO to me!

If it quacks like a duck, looks like a duck, it is probably a duck!



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written by Ed H , June 20, 2011

We'll likely not read this in the MSM, and the other Republican candidates seem unwilling to take Romney on. Reagan's 11th Commandment didn't extend to taking issue with another Republican's policy issues, only with making personal attacks.

It would have been a cold day when I would vote for Romney in the Primary before I read this. This makes me wonder if I could vote for him in the General, or sit at home and let Dear Leader have another 4 years to destroy the country. At least a re-election of Dear Leader wouldn't have a Republican destroying the country, as it appears Romney wouldn't have any problem doing.



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written by Jonathan Green , August 02, 2011

What should be clear to the whole world watching the debt-ceiling battle is that the Republicans are far more intent on taking the president's scalp than balancing the nation's books. They had ample opportunities to do the latter during the eight years of George W. Bush.

Sen. Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., the minority leader with the greatest cunning and sharpest knife, signaled his party's true purpose last year when he proclaimed: "The single most important thing we want to achieve is for President Obama to be a one-term president." It was not to undo the health care legislation Obama signed into law, or to block another debt limit increase. Even then, two years out from the next presidential election, the Alabama-born senator said the top goal of GOP lawmakers to oust Obama.

It's personal

House Majority Leader Eric Cantor, R-Va., has been especially relentless in the debt-ceiling fight. He attacked this first African-American president with a palpable disrespect not only for Obama personally, but also for his esteemed office.

Following what Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., called Cantor's "childish" display during a meeting with Obama, the House majority leader complained that the president had cut short the meeting and stormed out of the room. "He shoved back and said, 'I'll see you tomorrow' and walked out," Cantor snidely told reporters— as though the president needs his permission to end a White House gathering.

That encounter might have reminded Obama of the open letter Frederick Douglass, a runaway slave and abolitionist who became one of this nation's first black diplomats, wrote to his slave master.

It would be "a privilege" to show you "how mankind ought to treat each other," Douglass told the man who had badly mistreated him. "I am your fellow man, but not your slave."

Douglass' words might have prompted another reflection when, during a critical point in the debt negotiations, House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, contemptuously waited more than half a day to return a call from the president.

Racism, if subtle

Or, Obama might have heard Douglass' words ringing in his ears after acting House Speaker Steve LaTourette of Ohio had to warn his GOP colleagues during a heated debt-reduction debate on the House floor to stop making disparaging remarks about Obama.

This total lack of respect is downright contemptible — if not unpatriotic. Such contempt, I'm convinced, is rooted in something other than political differences. Today, you might not see the overt actions of racist southern governors like Ross Barnett or George Wallace in the 1960s. But the presence of Jim Crow, Jr. — a more subtle form of racism — is there.

Douglass viewed such behavior as "an outrage upon the soul." In this present case it is the soul of our nation, which still struggles to get beyond the awful ripple effects of its haunting history of human bondage.

McConnell, Boehner and Cantor are the vanguard of a political force of a dying era — one that looks more like the nation's past than its future.

Obama is the second president of this millennium, but the first chief executive of the America of new possibilities — a multiracial, multicultural nation whose emergence the old order is working mightily to forestall in its desperate attack on his presidency.

DeWayne Wickham writes on Tuesdays for USA TODAY.




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